Daily Mail

UPDATED: 12:06 EST, 26 November 2015


New York has 'soft spot' in defending against Paris-style ISIS attack because of NYPD's lack of counter-terror training, says union boss

By JAMES DUNN FOR MAILONLINE

  • Assault rifles would make a mockery of police 9mm, union bosses claim
  • All officers need counter-terrorism training as they are first line in defense
  • Otherwise, lives will be lost in the first few minutes of an attack, he claims
  • Other boss said it would be like 'sending canaries down the coal mines' 

Cops in New York are has a 'soft spot' against a Paris-style attack because they don't have adequate counter-terrorism training or weapons, union bosses warned.

Pat Lynch, Patrolmen's Benevolent Association (PBA) President, said the assault rifles used in the Paris attacks would make a mockery of NYPD 9mm guns that would be used in such an event.

Pat Lynch, Patrolmen's Benevolent Association (PBA) President, said the assault rifles used in the Paris attacks would make a mockery of NYPD 9mm guns that would be used in the event of a terrorist attack
Ed Mullins, president of the Sergeants Benevolent Association, said that sending cops to deal with a Paris-style attack with current provisions is equivalent to 'sending canaries into coal mines'
Mr Lynch said cops are the first line of defense and cars need to be equipped as individual counter-terrorism units or lives will be lost in the crucial first minutes of an attack while they wait for special units to respond
Mr Mullins added added that police need to be properly equipped as a matter of urgency as intelligence indicates that an attack in New York, similar to the one in Paris, is 'just a matter of time'

Ed Mullins, president of the Sergeants Benevolent Association, said that sending cops to deal with a similar attack with current provisions is equivalent to 'sending canaries into coal mines'.

He added that police need to be properly equipped as a matter of urgency as intelligence indicates that an attack in New York, similar to the one in Paris, is 'just a matter of time'.

And Mr Lynch said that police cars need to be equipped as individual counter-terrorism units or lives will be lost in the crucial first minutes of an attack while they wait for special units to respond. 

'In the event of multiple, simultaneous attacks, countless lives could be saved by equipping patrol officers with the appropriate weapons and giving them the training needed to engage terrorists immediately instead of waiting for specialized units to respond,' he told the New York Post. 

The comments come after 129 people were killed in Paris after Isis terrorists launched various attacks across the city earlier this month, prompting international panic over the suddenly very real threat of the terrorist group.

It happened in the same year as the Charlie Hebdo massacre in the same city in February, and Isis has carried out a number of other recent attacks, including the downing of a Russian passenger carrier above Egypt at the end of October.

The scale of the recent killing on western soil is almost unprecedented, perhaps only eclipsed by the attacks on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001, in which nearly 3,000 people lost their lives in New York.

Mr Mullins said that the 9/11 attacks by Al Qaeda were not considered a 'credible threat' at the time, along with a number of other recent acts of terrorism, which he thinks proves that New York needs to expect the unexpected and prepare for the worst.

However, the NYPD insists that special SWAT teams known as Emergency Service Units provide round-the-clock coverage of all boroughs of the city and could rapidly respond to any threat.

Spokesman Stephen Davis also highlighted the new Critical Response Command (CRC), with 500 officers, and the 800 in the Strategic Response Group that would be on-hand in the event of an emergency.

He said it was 'unnecessary and impractical' for every officer in the city to be armed with heavy assault-style weapons, and insisted that the force was adequately prepared to deal with an attack.