New York Daily News

February 5, 2015, 2:13 AM

  

 

NYPD Commissioner Bratton opposes Cuomo's proposal for independent monitor when grand jury fails to indict cop

 

Testifying at a state Senate hearing, Bratton said the city already has five district attorneys who 'are not shy about investigating' cops - plus U.S. attorneys, an NYPD inspector general and a federal monitor for the department.

BY ERIN DURKIN

BRYAN R. SMITH/BRYAN R. SMITH
Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association president Patrick Lynch said the killer who shot two cops in Brooklyn in December 'took his cue from the stream of hateful anti-police rhetoric that was allowed to flow unchecked.'

Like his boss the mayor, Police Commissioner Bill Bratton has some differences with Gov. Cuomo.

Bratton made it clear Wednesday he opposes Cuomo’s proposal to impose an independent monitor when a grand jury fails to indict a cop who has killed an unarmed citizen.

Testifying at a state Senate hearing, Bratton said the city already has five district attorneys who “are not shy about investigating” cops - plus U.S. attorneys, an NYPD inspector general and a federal monitor for the department.

“For the case of the city of New York, it would seem to me initially on its face that it’s another level on top of what I would describe as already sufficient levels,” he said.

Bratton acknowledged the NYPD is suffering from bad morale - which he blamed in part on protests that broke out after a grand jury declined to indict Daniel Pantaleo, whose chokehold killed Eric Garner.

“Morale in the department is not where we would like it to be,” he said.

“Policing demonstrations, crowd management, crowd control is difficult at any time. But when it’s being directed against you, it can have a wearing effect,” he said.

Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association president Patrick Lynch went further, saying the killer who shot two cops in Brooklyn in December “took his cue from the stream of hateful anti-police rhetoric that was allowed to flow unchecked.”

He took another implicit shot at the mayor, saying: “Some of our elected leaders may have repeatedly proclaimed their ‘support’ for police officers, but their actions and policies have amounted to official support for those who distrust and disdain law enforcement.”

He also blasted Cuomo’s proposed grand jury overhaul, saying such changes “would effectively place police officers in a separate justice system...This is a blatantly unjust and inequitable concept.”

In his testimony, Bratton backed making resisting arrest a felony. “I’m very supportive of increased penalties,” he said, complaining that offenders too often get “a get out of jail free card.”

But Bratton shot down legislation to require cop cars to be equipped with bullet-proof glass. He said the scheme would cost $50,000 per car, prevent windows from opening all the way, and might make it harder for cops to escape their cars by breaking glass in an emergency.