December 10, 2014 | 9:29am

 

City Council to make it easier to bring complaints against cops

By Michael Gartland, Shawn Cohen and Bruce Golding

Reuters

Council Member Debi Rose reads off names of people killed by police violence during a "die-in" protest on the steps of City Hall on Dec. 8.

Open the floodgates!

Cop haters will soon be able to make complaints against the NYPD from the comfort of their local City Council members’ district offices.

Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito on Wednesday announced a new program aimed at making it easier for people to accuse cops of misconduct.

Under the plan, select council members will establish “Community Outreach locations” for the Civilian Complaint Review Board, with staffers trained to help accusers fill out paperwork.

Council members also will provide space for CCRB investigators to take the accusers’ “formal statements,” which are needed for the board’s probes to proceed.

Currently, those statements must be made in person at CCRB headquarters in lower Manhattan.

Mark-Viverito’s announcement marked the latest salvo in the council’s war on cops, which last year included creating an Inspector General’s Office to oversee the NYPD.

The new program is the result of lobbying by CCRB President Richard Emery, whose previous efforts at “community outreach” have actually resulted in a drop in complaints against cops.

The head of the Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association blasted the council’s meddling in the CCRB process, saying he was “disgusted with the double-talk coming out of this City Council.”

“If this council is interested in really improving police-community relations, let them introduce a bill requiring the complaints to be sworn under penalty of perjury that will help to separate real complaints from flat-our harassment of arresting officers,” PBA President Patrick Lynch said.

Councilman Steven Matteo (R-SI) opposed Mark-Viverito’s program, saying the council needed to be “impartial” and shouldn’t get involved in filing complaints against cops.

Council members who plan to participate in the program include outspoken NYPD critics Jumaane Williams (D-Brooklyn), Vanessa Gibson (D-Bronx) and Andy King (D-Bronx).

But a councilman whose district covers Brooklyn’s 75th Precinct — which has the highest rate of CCRB complaints — said he hadn’t yet decided his position.

Democrat Rafael Espinal said he wants to talk with NYPD brass about the possibility of filing perjury charges against accusers who file false complaints against cops.