Newsday
Updated May 31, 2016 9:07 PM


Bill de Blasio attacked by New York City PBA on cop salaries

By    matthew.chayes@newsday.com

The NYPD’s largest labor union released a new TV ad Tuesday attacking Mayor Bill de Blasio for paying city cops less than their counterparts on Long Island and elsewhere in the region.

The Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association’s 30-second commercial, called “Families,” invokes de Blasio’s stated aim of closing the gap between the rich and poor.

“Mayor de Blasio promised to end income inequality. But he’s refusing to protect the families of the men and women who protect our city. Tell the mayor police officers have families too. Pay them fairly,” an announcer says over slow piano music.

Interspersed with video showing black, Latino and Asian women and children is the statement that NYPD cops make “on average ... 34 percent less than other cops.”

In trying to make its case to a mediator last year, the union pointed to Suffolk’s average basic maximum pay of $120,126 over a period of 20 years, Nassau’s average of $105,070 and New York City’s, $82,129.

On Tuesday, de Blasio’s office released a memo that said PBA members earn 146 percent of the average salary for cops in big American cities including benefits, and 111 percent without.

“Our door has always been — and continues to be — open to the PBA to negotiate a long-term contract, as we’ve done with nearly the entire city workforce to date,” de Blasio spokesman Austin Finan said in a statement.

Last year, in binding arbitration, a mediator gave PBA members 1-percent-a-year raises over the period 2010-2012 — the same hike that nearly every other city uniformed union negotiated.

The PBA ad was produced by Tusk Strategies, a firm headed by the former campaign manager for de Blasio’s predecessor, Republican Michael Bloomberg.

PBA spokesman Al O’Leary said the ad will run for the next two weeks, including during Yankees and Mets broadcasts on YES and SNY, as well as ABC 7, CBS 2, PIX 11, NBC 4, Fox 5, WLNY 10/55, CNN, MSNBC, Fox News and CNBC.

It’s the union’s second ad on the salary issue. O’Leary said the campaign has cost a total of $1 million.