New York Daily News

May 31, 2016, 11:25 AM

  

 

Patrolmen's Benevolent Association launches second TV ad pressuring de Blasio to back higher NYPD salaries

BY GRAHAM RAYMAN

The city's largest police union took another televised shot at Mayor de Blasio Tuesday as part of a campaign pressuring him to back higher salaries for cops.

The advertisement, titled “Families,” was released early Tuesday by the Patrolmen's Benevolent Association and shows family members of police officers who can’t afford to live in the city, the union said.

"Mayor de Blasio promised to end income inequality, but he's refusing to protect the families of the men and women who protect their city," the ad’s voiceover says, accompanied by gauzy images of cops’ family members. “Tell the Mayor: Police officers have families too. Pay them fairly.”

The ad says that NYPD officers are paid 34% less on average than police officers in other jurisdictions.

No cops themselves are featured in the new ad.

The PBA is spending more than $1 million on the campaign, which began earlier this month with another ad, titled “Jennifer,” which focuses on the wife of a cop with three daughters who is having trouble making ends meet.

CHRISTIE M. FARRIELLA FOR NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
The mayor talks about protecting the families of working New Yorkers, but when it comes to the wives, husbands, children, and partners of our police officers, he turns a blind eye,” PBA President Patrick Lynch (c.) said.

“The mayor talks about protecting the families of working New Yorkers, but when it comes to the wives, husbands, children, and partners of our police officers, he turns a blind eye,” PBA President Patrick Lynch said. “He needs to step up and bring an end to the injustice that is happening in his own police department.”

City officials disputed the claims, saying that, including benefits, city cops earn 146% of the average salary for police in large U.S. cities. They make 111% of the average pay if benefits aren’t included, officials said.

"Our door has always been — and continues to be — open to the PBA to negotiate a long-term contract, as we've done with nearly the entire city workforce to date," said de Blasio spokesman Austin Finan.

Last year, an arbitrator jointly selected by the PBA and the city ruled in favor of the city during a bitterly contentious contract negotiation.

Lynch then repeatedly attacked the arbitrator, Howard Edelman, and accused him of ethics violations. He even sent off-duty officers to protest outside Edelman’s house.

Those moves infuriated other arbitrators in the city. More than two dozen recently signed a letter saying they would refuse all PBA work as a result of Lynch’s actions.

The PBA and the city are currently in negotiations for a new contract, which would be retroactive to 2012. Those talks have been ongoing for months.

The de Blasio administration has taken the position that raises for cops should be in line with those for other city workers.

“Had the PBA taken the pattern all other police unions in the city took, they would have gotten an 11% raise and a seven year contract that significantly boosted an officer's pay by thousands of dollars,” a city official said.