Upd. March 16, 2016 | 1:48pm  


Police union hires consulting firm to negotiate raises with City Hall

By Tina Moore

The NYPD’s largest police union is bringing in the big guns to fight City Hall for more pay for rank-and-file cops.

The Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association, which represents about 24,000 cops, hired the consulting firm Tusk Strategies to take on Mayor de Blasio over raises and pensions for city cops in the future.

The union and city have been at odds since cops received a paltry 1% raise in arbitration.

Tusk came out swinging this week with a poll it oversaw in which 96% of the 6,000 reported being dissatisfied with de Blasio. The union’s hoping to avoid arbitration and reach an agreement with the city when it’s time to renegotiate, officials said. A union spokesman refused to say how much the firm was being paid.

“This is not about picking a fight with City Hall, or Bill de Blasio vs. Pat Lynch,” a source familiar with the arrangement said. “This is about seeking a better, fairer contract and benefits and protecting their members.”

But the firm has been involved in contentious fights before.

The firm’s head, Bradley Tusk, ran the 2009 re-election campaign for Mayor Michael Bloomberg — a year in which City Council overturned term limits so a third-party candidate could run. Bloomberg had already been elected twice.

Tusk also oversaw Uber’s campaign to do business among yellow taxis in the city and is working with the Times Square Alliance as it tries to iron out new regulations in the Crossroads of the World, where topless painted women have been hassling passersby for money.

PBA President Patrick Lynch confirmed that the firm was brought on last month to advocate on behalf of the union. The union wouldn’t reveal how much it was paying the firm.

“We look forward to working with the Tusk team to help support our members in the work that they do in this increasingly difficult environment and we hope to engage in a productive dialogue with the Mayor’s Office and City Council about addressing critical benefits issues and fairly compensating NYC police officers,” Lynch said in a statement.