August 2, 2016 | 11:05am  


Police union ruins Mayor de Blasio’s breakfast

By Vinita Singla, Jamie Schram and Gina Daidone

PBA protest against mayor Bill de Blasio on Tuesday outside his favorite Park Slope coffee shop. Photo: Paul Martinka

The city’s largest police union ruined Mayor de Blasio’s first cup of morning java, staging multiple protests Tuesday — including outside his favorite Park Slope coffee shop — calling on Hizzoner to give cops a hefty 34 percent pay hike to offset ever-rising cost of living expenses in the Big Apple.

“We want him to support NYC police officers, pay us as professionals, staff us properly and equip us so we can equip ourselves and protect the public as well. He’s refused to do that,” Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association President, Pat Lynch, told a gaggle of reporters outside Gracie Mansion.

PBA protest against Bill de Blasio. Photo: Paul Martinka

Lynch vowed that his members would be showing up at all of the mayor’s favorite morning haunts.

“We understand how his schedule goes, he leaves here Gracie Mansion; drives off to Brooklyn into Park Slope and goes to the gym. So we have our members here at Gracie Mansion, we have them at Park Slope and we have them at the coffee shop –where he likes to have his coffee,” Lynch said.

The mayor was met by an angry crowd of about 30 PBA protesters outside Park Slope coffee shop Colson Patisserie.

After getting his cup of Joe, he walked across the street to the YMCA for his daily workout, but was confronted by more PBA cops shotuning, “Eat later, pay us now”
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The mayor smiled awkwardly, but did not respond.

PBA protest against Bill de Blasio. Photo: Paul Martinka

The PBA has been at loggerheads with Hizzoner over the salary issue for two years and negotiations have broken down.

The mayor has argued that NYPD cops are not underpaid compared with officers in other cities when you look at the pay scales.

Lynch has countered that the Mayor is not factoring in the much higher cost of living expenses in New York City.